Promoting access to quality, safe, and relevant education for all persons affected by crisis

Journal on Education in Emergencies - Vol. 4


The fourth issue of the Journal on Education in Emergencies (JEiE) was published in August 2018.

This exciting new issue of JEiE includes five research articles, one field note, and four book reviews. It features a diverse cohort of authors who employ a wide range of methodologies and disciplinary approaches. Three pieces shine new light on refugees’ experiences with education in kindergarten, in adolescence, and in higher education. A special sub-section on education administration in postconflict societies offers three articles that comment on reforms to education systems that are embedded in intrastate peace agreements, on policy transfer, and on the complex interrelationship between identity, ethnicity, and control over territory, and over education within a territory.

The full JEiE, Volume 4, Number 1, can be downloaded for free, and individual articles can be downloaded by clicking on the titles below. The article abstracts are included below on this page. More about this issue of JEiE, including a note from the Editor, can be read on the INEE Blog.

For detailed information about the Journal on Education in Emergencies, and for instructions on how submit articles, please visit www.ineesite.org/journal.

 

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Journal on Education in Emergencies, Vol. 4, Num. 1 

August 2018

EDITORIAL NOTE

Editorial Board

EiE RESEARCH ARTICLES

Fifi the Punishing Cat and Other Civic Lessons from a Lebanese Public Kindergarten School  [Abstract]
Thea Renda Abu El-Haj, Garene Kaloustian, Sally Wesley Bonet, and Samira Chatila
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17609/xnpr-ce74

Pathways to Resilience in Risk-Laden Environments: A Case Study of Syrian Refugee Education in Lebanon  [Abstract]
Oula Abu-Amsha and Jill Armstrong
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17609/s563-0t15


Special Sub-section on Education Administration in Postconflict Societies: Opportunities and Challenges

Mapping the Relationship between Education Reform and Power-Sharing in and after Intrastate Peace Agreements: A Multi-Methods Study  [Abstract]
Giuditta Fontana
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17609/3m0x-8692

Developing Social Cohesion through Schools in Northern Ireland and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia: A Study of Policy Transfer  [Abstract]
Rebecca Loader, Joanne Hughes, Violeta Petroska-Beshka, and Ana Tomovska Misoska
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17609/hkpx-p638

The Politics of Education in Iraq: The Influence of Territorial Dispute and
Ethno-Politics on Schooling in Kirkuk
  
[Abstract]
Kelsey Shanks
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17609/wstg-0v02


EiE FIELD NOTE

The Borderless Higher Education for Refugees Project: Enabling Refugee and Local Kenyan Students in Dadaab to Transition to University Education  
[Abstract]
Wenona Giles
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17609/wsjc-h122


BOOK REVIEWS

(Re)Constructing Memory: Education, Identity, and Conflict edited by Michelle J. Bellino and James H. Williams
Emily Dunlop
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17609/1vkz-g973

Child Migration and Human Rights in a Global Age by Jacqueline Bhabha
Jordan Naidoo
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17609/nf7d-kh37

Transitional Justice and Education: Learning Peace by Clara Ramírez-Barat and Roger Duthie
Tina Robiolle
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17609/s4ww-5h16

Youth in Postwar Guatemala: Education and Civic Identity in Transition by Michelle J. Bellino
Diana Rodríguez-Gómez
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17609/vspf-y732


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Abstracts from JEiE, Volume 4, Number 1

 

Fifi the Punishing Cat and Other Civic Lessons from a Lebanese Public Kindergarten School
Thea Renda Abu El-Haj, Garene Kaloustian, Sally Wesley Bonet, and Samira Chatila

Across the world, education is tasked with rebuilding societies torn apart by violent conflict and riven by economic injustice. In this article, we focus on kindergarten education in the vulnerable, conflict-ridden Lebanese context. However, rather than analyzing the academic learning offered to the children, we consider the affective civic education they are getting through the everyday practices in their classrooms and schools and explore their agency within this social world. By affective civic education we mean the ways that children, even those as young as three to five, are developing embodied messages about their public place as citizen-subjects: about belonging and/or exclusion; about how they are expected to relate to power and authority; and about how to act within and on their social world. Thus, we analyze how children are educated into the affective, lived dimensions of citizenship and belonging.

 
Pathways to Resilience in Risk-Laden Environments: A Case Study of Syrian Refugee Education in Lebanon
Oula Abu-Amsha and Jill Armstrong

Resilience is most often understood as the ability to achieve well-being in the face of significant adversity. It is both a dynamic process and an outcome that can be pursued by individuals and communities alike. Despite becoming an increasingly popular topic in policy fields such as education, development, and refugee studies, there is limited research into the promotion of resilience within refugee education. This qualitative study, which examines the experiences of Syrian refugee children who are attending a non-formal education center in Lebanon, seeks to understand the role education plays in fostering pathways to resilience in the children’s lives. Half of the students in the study had chosen to drop out of the Lebanese formal schools they attended. This study argues that the students who chose to drop out felt that the risks they faced while attending Lebanese schools were not worth the rewards, thus they sought different pathways to resilience. Many chose to attend non-formal schools like the one involved in this study, which supported the students in finding pathways to resilience. The insights gained from studying these schools could help to improve education for Syrian refugees in Lebanon, including how to provide safe, affordable, productive, and culturally relevant education choices for more children and their families, and to support more refugee children and youth in choosing education as a pathway to resilience.

 
Mapping the Relationship between Education Reform and Power-Sharing in and after Intrastate Peace Agreements: A Multi-Methods Study
Giuditta Fontana

To what extent does the adoption of consociational power-sharing affect the design and implementation of education reforms? This article maps this territory through rich and detailed interviews collected in Lebanon, Northern Ireland, and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia in 2012-2013. Insights from these interviews are corroborated by evidence from the first large-scale dataset of educational provisions in intrastate peace settlements (the Political Agreements in Internal Conflict [PAIC] dataset). There is strong evidence that the values and practices of power-sharing affect the implementation of education reforms: they constrain syncretistic (integrationist or assimilationist) initiatives and enable pluralistic reforms. Analysis of the PAIC dataset also suggests a relationship between the adoption of power-sharing and the inclusion of education reforms in peace agreements: pacts including power-sharing are more likely to also include pluralistic education reforms. Beyond their implications for the theory and practice of postconflict education reform, these findings inform research on peace agreements and on the factors conducive to successful power-sharing.

 
Developing Social Cohesion through Schools in Northern Ireland and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia: A Study of Policy Transfer
Rebecca Loader, Joanne Hughes, Violeta Petroska-Beshka, and Ana Tomovska Misoska

Transferring education policy from one country to another, or between supranational bodies and national administrations, is common practice, and the potential benefits for educational quality and standards are evident. Despite these advantages, the dominant approaches to policy transfer have been criticized for, among other things, neglecting contextual influences on policy and prioritizing the economic function of education over others. In this article, we consider an example of policy transfer for another purpose: to promote social cohesion through schools, specifically in societies that have experienced ethnic division and conflict. Focusing on the model of shared education, which promotes school collaboration and contact between pupils across ethnic or religious boundaries, we explore a process of policy transfer between Northern Ireland and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. Drawing from documentary analysis, interviews with practitioners in both countries, and direct personal experience, we examine the purpose, nature, and impact of this case of policy transfer and identify what lessons can be shared with future education initiatives.

 
The Politics of Education in Iraq: The Influence of Territorial Dispute and Ethno-Politics on Schooling in Kirkuk
Kelsey Shanks

The Iraqi Disputed Territories, or Disputed Internal Boundaries, consist of 15 districts stretching across four northern governorates from the Syrian to Iranian borders. The oil-rich Iraqi governorate of Kirkuk lies at the heart of this dispute and reflects the country’s ethnic and religious diversity. Arabs, Turkmen, Kurds, and Assyrians all claim ancient settlement patterns within the governorate. The symbolic importance of Kirkuk as a homeland to both the Kurds and the Turkmen conflicts directly with its strategic importance to Baghdad. While the two linguistically distinct centers of governance vie for control, interethnic communal tensions are rising and questions of identity increasingly overshadow day-to-day life. The existing research on Kirkuk focuses heavily on governance outcomes and possible administrative solutions, but little has been written about the impact of heightened identity politics on the everyday lives of citizens. This paper explores the influence of these conflicts and contests on education in the city of Kirkuk.

 
The Borderless Higher Education for Refugees Project: Enabling Refugee and Local Kenyan Students in Dadaab to Transition to University Education
Wenona Giles

This article examines some of the challenges experienced by students living in and near the Dadaab refugee camps in northeastern Kenya who were making the transition from secondary school to university programs. The students were enrolled in courses offered by two Kenyan and two Canadian universities that were partners in the Borderless Higher Education for Refugees project. The context of Dadaab and the structure of the pilot project are also explored.

 

 

Creative Commons License
Creative Commons LicenseThe Journal on Education in Emergencies, published by the Inter-Agency Network for Education in Emergencies (INEE), is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

 

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For detailed information about the Journal on Education in Emergencies, and for instructions on how submit article, please visit www.ineesite.org/journal.