Foundational Standards-Community Participation, Coordination and Analysis

Foundational Standards-Community Participation, Coordination and Analysis

Introduction

Review the Standards and Key Actions in the Foundational Standards-Community Participation, Coordination and Analysis.

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Think about these Standards and Key Actions as you answer the questions in this section.

Community Participation Standard 1: Participation

Community members participate actively, transparently and without discrimination in analysis, planning, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of education responses.

Key actions (to be read in conjunction with the guidance notes)

  • A range of community members participate actively in prioritising and planning education activities to ensure safe, effective and equitable delivery of education (see guidance notes 1-4).
  • Community education committees include representatives of all vulnerable groups (see guidance notes 1-4).
  • Children and youth participate actively in the development, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of education activities (see guidance note 5).
  • A wide range of community members participate in assessments, context analyses, social audits of education activities, joint budget reviews, and disaster risk reduction and conflict mitigation activities (see guidance note 6).
  • Training and capacity building opportunities are available to community members (see guidance note 7).

Community Participation Standard 2: Resources

Community resources are identified, mobilised and used to implement age-appropriate learning opportunities.

Key actions (to be read in conjunction with the guidance notes)

  • Communities, education personnel and learners identify and mobilise local resources to strengthen access to quality education (see guidance notes 1-3).
  • Education authorities, the local community and humanitarian stakeholders recognise existing skills and knowledge and design education programmes to maximise the use of these capacities (see guidance notes 4-5).
  • National authorities, the local community and humanitarian stakeholders use community resources to develop, adapt and deliver education that incorporates disaster risk reduction and conflict mitigation (see guidance note 5).

Coordination Standard 1: Coordination

Coordination mechanisms for education are in place and support stakeholders working to ensure access to and continuity of quality education.

Key actions (to be read in conjunction with the guidance notes)

  • Education authorities, which are responsible for fulfilling the right to education, assume a leadership role for education response, including convening and participating in coordination mechanisms with other education stakeholders (see guidance note 1).
  • An inter-agency coordination committee coordinates assessment, planning, information management, resource mobilisation, capacity development and advocacy (see guidance note 1).
  • A range of levels and types of education are considered in coordination activities (see guidance note 1).
  • Education authorities, donors, UN agencies, NGOs, communities and other stakeholders use timely, transparent, equitable and coordinated financing structures to support education activities (see guidance note 2).
  • Transparent mechanisms for sharing information on the planning and coordination of responses exist within the coordination committee and across coordination groups (see guidance notes 3-4).
  • Joint assessments are carried out to identify capacities and gaps in education response (see guidance note 4).
  • All stakeholders adhere to the principles of equality, transparency, responsibility and accountability to achieve results (see guidance notes 5–6).

Analysis Standard 1: Assessment

Timely education assessments of the emergency situation are conducted in a holistic, transparent and participatory manner.

Key actions (to be read in conjunction with the guidance notes)

  • An initial rapid education assessment is undertaken as soon as possible, taking into account security and safety (see guidance note 1).
  • The assessment collects disaggregated data that identify local perceptions of the purpose and relevance of education, barriers to access to education and priority educational needs and activities (see guidance note 2).
  • Local capacities, resources and strategies for learning and education are identified, prior to and during the emergency (see guidance notes 2-5).
  • Context analysis is conducted to ensure that education responses are appropriate, relevant and sensitive to the potential for risks and conflict (see guidance note 3).
  • Representatives of the affected population participate in the design and implementation of data collection (see guidance notes 2-3, 5 and 7-8).
  • A comprehensive assessment of education needs and resources for the different levels and types of education is undertaken with the participation of key stakeholders (see guidance notes 2-7).
  • An inter-agency coordination committee coordinates assessments with other sectors and relevant stakeholders, to avoid duplication of efforts (see guidance notes 6 and 8).

Analysis Standard 2: Response Strategies

Inclusive education response strategies include a clear description of the context, barriers to the right to education and strategies to overcome those barriers.

Key actions (to be read in conjunction with the guidance notes)

  • Response strategies accurately reflect assessment findings (see guidance notes 1-2).
  • Education responses progressively meet the needs of affected populations for inclusive and quality education (see guidance notes 1, 5 and 8).
  • Response strategies are designed and implemented in ways that do not harm the community or providers and do not worsen the impact of the emergency (see guidance notes 3 and 7).
  • Information collected from the initial assessment and context analysis is regularly updated with new data to inform ongoing education responses (see guidance note 4).
  • Response strategies include capacity building to support education authorities and community members to carry out assessments and implement response activities (see guidance note 2).
  • Education responses complement and are harmonised with national education programmes (see guidance notes 6 and 8).
  • Baseline data are collected systematically at the start of a programme (see guidance note 9).

Analysis Standard 3: Monitoring

Regular monitoring of education response activities and the evolving learning needs of the affected population is carried out.

Key actions (to be read in conjunction with the guidance notes)

  • There are effective systems for regular monitoring of education response activities in emergency situations through to recovery (see guidance note 1).
  • Education response activities are monitored to ensure the safety and security of all learners, teachers and other education personnel (see guidance note 1).
  • Vulnerable people are regularly consulted, trained in data collection methodologies and involved in monitoring activities (see guidance note 2).
  • Disaggregated education data are systematically and regularly collected and inform education responses (see guidance notes 3-4).
  • Education data are analysed and shared at regular intervals with all relevant stakeholders, especially affected communities and vulnerable groups (see guidance notes 3-4).

Analysis Standard 4: Evaluation

Systematic and impartial evaluations improve education response activities and enhance accountability.

Key actions (to be read in conjunction with the guidance notes)

  • Regular evaluations of education response activities produce credible and transparent data and inform future education activities (see guidance notes 1-2).
  • All stakeholders, including representatives of the affected community and education authorities, are involved in evaluation activities (see guidance note 3).
  • Lessons and good practices are widely shared and inform future advocacy, programmes and policies (see guidance note 4).

Question 1

What are some activities that could be done in Chad to help meet the Foundational Standards of Community Participation, Coordination and Analysis? Please write your answer in the box and compare it with the feedback provided.

© Sweta Shah

Feedback

Community Participation Standard 1: Participation

Children, youth and community can actively participate in assessing the situation, designing the education programme, monitoring and evaluation. They can be mobilised to be part of the teams and work alongside NGOs, UN, and government agencies. While active participation is ideal, it is often difficult in an acute emergency because people may be too shocked and distressed by what has happened or may be too preoccupied dealing with the impacts of the disaster on their families' lives, homes and livelihoods. In situations where communities are severely distressed, it is important to offer them the opportunity to participate in decision-making on issues that concern the community.

Community Participation Standard 2: Resources

The community can contribute financially for education activities (i.e. school building, books, teaching and learning materials). This can be a small amount of funds contributed annually or monthly by each family. Whether a financial contribution is realistic and feasible will depend on the actual situation in the community. For example, in Chad, this might be very difficult given that many families live in poverty. In these situations, it would be better to ask communities or families to contribute their time or other community resources.

The community can contribute human resources (i.e. time, advice) for the monitoring and evaluation of education programmes, for constructing and repairing schools and for encouraging children to attend schools.

The community can also contribute intellectually by providing ideas for the most needed education interventions.

© Sabina Handschin

Coordination Standard 1: Coordination

An Education Cluster or similar structure for coordination can be set up in Abeche, the regional hub, and in each of the camps. (Currently in Chad, there is an Education cluster, under OCHA's overall responsibility, set up at the national and regional and some local levels for the internally displaced population, but a cluster does not exist for the refugee population. This is because UNHCR is mandated to take overall responsibility of refugee camps. However, a coordination system does exist in Eastern Chad for the refugee situation. For example, in Abeche, which is the regional hub, there are monthly meetings of the various sectors. In the camps, the meetings between the agencies supporting various activities in the camp meet more regularly. While this mechanism is in place, it needs to be strengthened and include more refugees in the meetings and decision-making.)

Analysis Standard 1: Assessment

Rapid initial inter-sectoral assessment can be conducted with education as a core component within the first week of the emergency or disaster with the active involvement of the community. A comprehensive education assessment can be conducted after the rapid initial assessment is conducted.

Assessment findings are shared with key stakeholders (e.g., affected communities, government, donors, partner agencies).

A contextual analysis (for both conflict and natural disasters) can be conducted to determine the most disaster prone parts of the country, what resources are already in place, what needs to be done to prepare for an emergency, etc. This would contribute to the development of a contingency plan.

Analysis Standard 2: Response Strategies

Baseline data can be collected at the start of the programme.

The education programme can be designed in collaboration with the affected community, including children and youth. The programme can be based on the INEE Minimum Standards framework and the context analysis conducted before the start of the emergency.

Analysis Standard 3: Monitoring

A monitoring plan can be developed in collaboration with affected communities, including children and youth.

Children, youth and community members can be mobilised to support monitoring of education activities (i.e. through child clubs, youth groups, education committees, child protection committees).

Analysis Standard 4: Evaluation

A mid-term and final evaluation can be conducted for the education programme to assess impact of the activities. Children, youth and community members are mobilised to assist with the evaluations. Results of the evaluations are shared widely, including with affected communities.